Tag: plr blog

PLR Tips: How is a PLR Report Different from an eBook?

Many PLR providers, like myself, offer both ‘reports’ and ‘ebooks’ in our content. But what is the difference?

When I think of what a report is – I like to think about it in terms of 2 things: length and format. In both cases, the details of length and formatting make it different from an article or an eBook.

Length – A report is going to be longer than your average article or blog post, and shorter than an eBook.

How long is a report? For me personally, I like to make my reports at least 1,750-2,000 words. Most of them are around the 2,000-word mark, but I do have some shorter or longer. I use Arial 12 font for my reports, so without images, a 2,000-word report ends up being about 5 pages. It is not uncommon to have one twice as long, so 4,000 words would be approximately 10 pages long.

This is considerably longer than a typical article, which can be anywhere from 400 to 1,000 words. An eBook varies in length by both the word count and number of pages, but my eBooks are about 10,000 words and 20+ pages long.

An easier way to think about it? A report is like an extra long article or a super short eBook. 

Formatting – Another difference I make with reports is in its formatting. This is also a little different than both articles and eBooks.

With articles, I like to format it very simply – I have an introduction, 3-5 sections with subheadings, and a conclusion. Easy peasy.

When I write an eBook, the formatting is much more complex. You have the Table of Contents, Disclaimer, Intro, Chapters, Sections, Sub-Sections, etc. Plus, eBooks usually include more images, which I very rarely put into reports.

My reports are somewhere in the middle – they are formatted slightly more than an article, but I don’t include a lot of the ‘extra’ stuff like a table of contents and disclaimer. I want you to know exactly what you are getting, so I try to make them strictly content.

What Do You Do with Them?

This is also going to be subjective, but here are a few things you can do with PLR reports:

  1. Use Them as Free Opt-ins– This is probably the easiest way to use a PLR report. They make perfect opt-ins, allowing you to get more people on your list. That’s what we all want, right?! Just edit the report and the cover for your own needs, create a simple opt-in on your site, and give it away for free to people who subscribe.

If you buy a PLR bundle that also comes with articles along with the report, like my latest Grain-Free Bundle, you can then use those articles as an email series for people who choose to opt-in with the report.

  1. Sell Them on Your Blog– You will need to look at the rights for the PLR report you purchase, but many providers will allow you to sell the report to people for personal use. This means if you edit the report and cover, you can sell it on your blog to your list, but you can’t sell PLR or resell rights to it.

Example: If you bought my Self-Care PLR Bundle (here), you received a 5-page report about ‘Starting a Self-Care Morning Routine’. If you have a blog where your readers are interested in self-care and self-improvement, you can edit this report and put it up on your blog to sell to your readers. They will be able to purchase it and find out how they can start their own morning routine for self-care purposes.

If you are ever confused about rights, just ask!

  1. Break Them Up Into Articles– Another option is to take the content from a report or break up the sections into individual articles. You can then use them as blog posts or emails for your list.

I have a blog post that shows you how to do that here: https://healthandwellnessplr.com/how-to-convert-a-plr-report-into-blog-posts/

Free Examples of My PLR Reports

If you’re still confused, I have some PLR reports in my Free PLR section that you can download instantly.

Ways to Drink More Water – https://healthandwellnessplr.com/product/ways-to-drink-more-water-plr-report/

Alkaline Foods – https://healthandwellnessplr.com/product/free-alkaline-foods-plr-report/

Superfoods for Vision – https://healthandwellnessplr.com/product/superfoods-for-vision-free/

Did that makes any sense?! A lot of times, you just need someone to put it into a certain perspective and then it clicks. I know that’s how it worked when I first started writing PLR. It took me a while before I started writing/offering reports, because I just didn’t get it. But now I do, and you guys seem to love them 🙂

 

Using Keto PLR for Your Health Niche

One of the tricky things about specific diet PLR is that you assume it only applies if you have a very specific type of niche. You know it obviously works if you have a keto blog, or even one that talks a lot about low-carb or Paleo in general. It is good for weight loss-related content, but that doesn’t mean YOUR niche won’t like it.

Here are some things to know about Keto and how you can use it for other purposes than just weight loss:

Keto helps reduce inflammation – One of the benefits of the ketogenic diet is that it can help reduce inflammation, perfect if you post content about diabetes and chronic conditions.

It is amazing for fighting sugar cravings – Just about everyone lately has been talking about the dangers of too much sugar, and Keto is extremely low in sugar, so it’s perfect for those nasty sugar cravings. This is also an amazing benefit of talking about Keto if you frequently discuss diabetes.

There are TONS of appliances to promote – Do you like to talk about healthy cooking because of the appliances? Keto encourages a lot of cooking at home, particularly with appliances like pressure cookers, slow cookers, grills, blenders, food processors, and similar appliances.

Journaling has a place with Keto – I personally love to use journals for writing about my Keto experience, recording food and exercise, and complaining about missing donuts 😛 If you like journaling content and promoting journals, there is definitely a way to cross-promote with diet-related content.

COFFEE! – If you have been grabbing the coffee PLR that has been coming out lately, you can easily use Keto content to add to it, since Keto coffee and Bulletproof coffee are frequently consumed on this diet.

I could seriously go on and on, but you get the point. When you see this type of micro-niche PLR, what I recommend, is looking first at the “health benefits” of the topic. This is usually a good place to find out if those benefits apply to what you like to promote the most.

Find out what you get in my brand new Keto FAQs bundle by clicking here.

 

How to Write About Sensitive Topics on Your Blog

I feel comfortable writing about emotional eating and anxiety and depression and eating disorders because not only have I been around a lot of people with them and done my research, but I have experienced them myself.

This might not be the case for you, so if you want to talk about sensitive topics on your blog and don’t have personal experience to share (or are a little weary about discussing it), these are my tips.

  1. Always Include a Disclaimer

This goes for everyone, whether you are discussing your own experience with eating disorders or mental health, or you are using PLR on your blog. Some content you add to your blog might be worded in a way that makes it sound like you are giving advice. Be careful! Make sure your readers know you are not a medical or mental health professional.

  1. Be Careful About Using the Word ‘Treatment’

This is something I learned just recently, so I have since adjusted how my titles and content is written. I advise you think before you tell your readers about natural options for treatment. With this type of angle, I would personally use ‘manage’ or ‘cope’, instead of insinuating they can fully treat or cure an eating disorder without medical intervention.

  1. Stay Neutral About Natural VS Medical Options

There are a lot of things people can do on their own to help cope with an eating disorder or mental health issue, but that doesn’t mean it will help everyone, or that they should only rely on that.

This is where this topic gets tricky. I know many of you are like me where you tend to lean more toward natural and holistic options.

Personally, I do a lot of journaling and self-care at home, but I also have a therapist. I don’t medicate and do talk therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy instead, but this isn’t for everyone.

This is why I would stay neutral. Of course, you can do whatever you feel comfortable with, but if you are a little weary about the topic, I would mention ALL options. With eating disorders, I highly, highly recommend encouraging them to also get help from a professional for treatment (see what I mean about treatment?).

Eating disorders are potentially life-threatening – so it’s okay if you don’t agree with my approach – but that is the only way I would personally feel comfortable talking about it.

  1. Do Research on Proper Wording

This one is more about being sensitive and not wanting to offend someone. It is really hard researching your own eating disorder or mental health issue when so many blogs or sites will use wording that makes you instantly feel worse.

I think the best place to go to figure out how to word this type of content is blogs or social media of people who have these issues. Not just someone offering advice – but those actually suffering from it. Look through their posts and see how they personally like to talk about it. You can learn a lot just by spending a little extra time learning about the sufferers themselves.

Quick Tip: Look up things like “what not to say to someone with an eating disorder” and similar phrases in Google. You should get some good ideas of what not to say with those results as well.

  1. Know the PLR Providers Beforehand

The reason I feel comfortable promoting Susie & Geoff after they wrote about eating disorders is because they write (most, if not all) their own content, and they do their research. I would absolutely trust them to take their time making sure the content is not half-assed, and approaching this type of topic with kindness.

Other PLR providers have attempted this type of topic, and I refused to promote because I didn’t like how they talked about eating disorders or mental health. So my last tip is to really know who you are buying prewritten content from when it comes to highly sensitive topics.

I hope this helped! Let me know if you have any questions.

 

4 Ways to Find Your Next Blog Post Topics

Today at Health & Wellness PLR, we are talking about blog topics – and how to find inspiration for future blog posts.

There are of course the typical methods:

Look at seasons or holidays coming up and plan on posts for those holidays.

Re-visit old topics and put a fresh spin on them.

Read through the most recent news articles about your niche and cover those in your blog posts.

Purchase PLR packs to give you starter posts that you can customize. << BIG fan of this one 😉

There are also a few more ways I love to choose new topics, that I thought might be helpful for you. Some of these you probably already do, but others might be a bit unconventional.

  1. Choose random keywords and search them on Pinterest

I love Pinterest, not just for personal reasons, but because it is an awesome way to find out what is trending. There are a few different ways to search Pinterest for topics, from just looking through the latest pins of people you follow, to checking the “Explore” tab.

My favorite way? Just searching for completely random (or not so random) keywords. You might be surprised what you find. It can be something broad like “nutrition” or specific like “herbal remedies”. Don’t just stick to what you find on the first page – take some time looking through the pins, going through to page 3, 4 or 10, and see what you find.

In many cases, you discover unique topics you never would have thought of.

  1. Find ‘trendy’ health blogs or websites and view their latest articles

Let’s be honest.. there are a lot of crazy health trends out there. I don’t talk about everything I come across, but I often find interesting angles or micro-niches that I know you guys would be interested in.

If your health niche is more on the medical side, I recommend going to sites like WebMD or Mayo Clinic, and just looking through some of their topics. WebMD often puts their latest articles right on the front page, so you know what people are currently reading about. *I would do your research outside of these sites – they are just good for ideas.

For other health topics, I recommend finding health blogs of people who tend to talk about the trendy stuff – things that are brand new in the health community. I am not a big fan of Dr. Oz (and I know he is super controversial), but he does tend to have a lot of the more trendy/popular health topics. I suggest doing your own research elsewhere, but there is nothing wrong with taking a peek every once in a while for some ideas.

  1. Browse image sites for inspiration

This is one of my favorite *secret* ways to find inspiration. Usually, you don’t look for images until after you have chosen your topic and angle, but why not reverse it? Sometimes, I will just browse through Pixabay or other imaging sites, and think of health topics for certain images I like.

You can just browse through their latest images, most popular images, or enter a keyword. Even something like “green” comes up with interesting stuff. Maybe you find an image of someone gardening, which reminds you that you haven’t talked about growing herbs yet.

  1. Think about health issues your family and friends suffer from

There is no reason you can’t use personal experiences to come up with health topics. Pay attention to what your friends post on social media. Is there something you see multiple people bringing up? Maybe more than one friend is talking about a new diet, or you keep seeing a hashtag on Twitter for the same fitness app. These are signs of new health trends you might want to cover.

I hope this helped give you a few ideas for your next blog post topics!

 

 

Behind-the-Scenes: How I Brainstorm My PLR Launches

 

Now that my Natural Skincare PLR Special has been released, I can finally show you how I chose the topics to go into this bundle.

I remember I was taking notes just like I do for everything, whether it is a “launch” or a small store pack, and when I was done I was like.. I should show this to someone. Because I’m curious if it makes any sense, and if other people work things out like this.

I am still a big fan of actual writing. I don’t take many notes digitally just because it’s a bit of a pain going back and forth between tabs and screens. It is SO much easier to just jot notes down on paper and look back on it.

I might be alone in this..

One last warning before we start – When I am trying to write fast, my chicken scratch game is strong. I can write pretty if I want to, but most of the time, my natural handwriting is kind of this lazy cursive/non-cursive hybrid.

I also apologize for how long this is..

How I Brainstorm a PLR Launch – From Keywords to the Funnel Layout

You will learn a few things about me and my process from the pictures below. 1. My handwriting is terrible. 2. I have no patience – I just want it down so I can keep going and not mess up my focus. 3. I like to change my mind a lot (look at the funnel in the last section, I completely changed the second upsell). 4. I almost never know what direction I’m going until I’m there.

1. Coming Up with the Main Topic

I don’t really have much to say about how I choose the main topic, which would be natural skincare in this example. The reason is because it constantly changes. Sometimes, it is a highly requested topic. Other times, I know it’s trending. I might just be really interested in writing it (like the bullet journaling PLR), or I haven’t seen it done yet (also the bullet journaling one).

You’re welcome for how helpful I’m sure that was.

2. Choosing Notes and Keywords

Once I know what the main topic is going to be, I start jotting down notes, keywords, anything I can think of or find. This often starts with just stuff already in my mind. That’s not unusual since before choosing a main topic, you will usually do some cursory research just to make sure there is enough out there to write about it (that hasn’t already been done to death).

You will see some different areas of words, keywords, sub-topics, etc in the image below. This is always how I start taking notes for anything I release.

 

3. How I Write Them Down

Another thing you will notice is that as I am writing keywords down, I tend to put them into different categories. It is SO confusing when you just have a long list of words, and have to try to puzzle piece them together into different areas to come up with something that makes sense.

So, as I am doing research or looking for inspiration, I will kind of separate them as I think of ideas. It is impossible not to see an idea like “natural treatments for rosacea” and not think “oh, maybe I should cover all the different skin conditions”. That is kind of what you get a glimpse of in these pictures.

 

4. Looking for PLR-Worthy Topics

Once I fill up a page – or run out of ideas (whichever comes first honestly), I start to look for patterns and inspiration. This is when I start putting the funnel together, by at least deciding what might work as an eBook, what should be a report, which topics might be better at articles.

That is what you see me working on in the image below.

I put an X next to topics I had already covered in other natural skincare PLR products in my store, stars next to the topics I liked the most, and squares around report and eBook ideas.

5. Planning Out the Funnel

And of course the last step is to put it all together. I do have a “template” for these bigger launches that I started with the bullet journaling one, so that at least gives me something to work off for the front end (FE) and the one-time offer (OTO). The second OTO is basically optional, and I always use current products for the downsell (DS).

I knew for the FE I wanted an eBook topic, report, articles, so I started with that. I filled in the lines as needed, and moved onto the OTO. I did change a few things around as will almost always happen, and the OTO2 never happened obviously..

Why am I showing you this?! For fun. Because I can. In case you were looking for ways to brainstorm your own content. For fun.

-Jenn

 

 

How I Manage My Time (as a Major Workaholic)

 

I have what they call “The inability to focus on just one thing” syndrome. Also called.. workaholic-ism (sure let’s make that a real word). It’s not just a matter of Shiny Object Syndrome (which I think everyone has to a certain point), but I really just like to pile on the work as much as possible.

I don’t necessarily recommend it, but if this sounds like something you do, you might be like me where your biggest struggle is managing your time.

I’m no expert, but since I love reading what other people do for productivity and managing their time better while working on multiple projects, I figured I would share with you what has been working for me.

1. I am a Stickler for Lists

If you don’t currently keep about a million lists, you’re doing it wrong. I wouldn’t get shit done if I didn’t have about 5 different to-do lists to focus on every day. It might seem like overkill, but I have so many projects going at one time, this is the only way I am going to get everything done.

The reason I don’t just have one daily to-do list is because it doesn’t provide enough detail for each task of an individual project. So, I have one main to-do list of what needs to be done that day. Then for each of those main projects, I have a separate to-do list that shows the individual tasks to be done.

It works great at motivating me to finish everything if for no other reason than I feel accomplished every time I can cross something off one of my many lists.

2. I Work in 2-Hour Time Blocks

This is something I have started doing recently, and to be honest with you, I don’t always keep up with it. It really depends on the day and what I have going on. But on days when there is mostly writing to be done, I find 2-hour blocks to work the best. This allows me to really sit down and get a big bulk of writing done in those time blocks, but also gives my brain and my hands a rest from all the typing.

Working in time blocks lets you set a different project for each time block, but you can decide on how long they should be. I recommend a short break in between each one, but if you have a habit of a “quick break” turning into a “short 5-hour Netflix marathon”, you might want to time them.

3. I Get Work Ready the Night Before

If there is one thing that helps the most (aside from my lists), this is it. It’s something I noticed over time based on my own personal habits. You may love spending the first hour every morning just working on what has to be done that day, that’s great! Congrats on being better than the rest of us 😛

For me, I have noticed if I don’t start my work day on the projects that need to be done immediately, I get lazy and my brain has a hard time focusing. What works for me is doing all the prep-work, whether it is making detailed lists, researching articles, or outlining blog posts the night before, so that when my work day begins in the morning, I just open up documents and go.

4. I Reward Myself for Finishing Projects

This is something I do when I am not working in strict time blocks, so really it is an alternative to that. There are some days where time blocks don’t work because I have all these mini projects, not necessarily a day that includes 12 hours of writing. On these days, it works better when I work on one project as quickly and efficiently as I can, then reward myself with something. As a TV junkie, it’s usually an episode of something on Netflix, but it can be anything you want. When I get into a really good book, it’s sometimes reading a chapter or two between each mini project I do throughout the day.

Sometimes playing tricks on yourself works best.

5. I Hit My Morning Routine Hard

I have talked about my morning routine before, which is really how I am getting ahead with work right now. I was stuck for a while in a huge rut where I had no motivation and massive burnout. I still do get burnout sometimes since I try to do too much, but for the most part, my morning routine has improved my work days.

Basically what I did is add some tasks to do right when I wake up, from doing a morning workout to journaling and sometimes doing motivation – in the hopes I won’t fall asleep in the process.

I’m going to sound like a broken record here, but that’s because it’s important – You have to do what works for YOU. If some things on this list won’t work for you, your lifestyle, or your schedule, don’t do them! Just find whatever helps keep you motivated and helps you to manage your time throughout the day.

Healthy Meal Planning PLR + My 61-Page Bonus

 

Get my 61-page bonus with this brand new Healthy Meal Planning PLR bundle.

I’m back with another big bonus for you! Ruth from Content Shortcuts has a new PLR special that was just launched this morning. It is all about healthy meal planning, which is great timing because summer is already half over! This is the time to start planning for the fall when the kids are back in school and you have busier work days. Now, your list can learn how to plan and prep their meals ahead of time, not only saving time and money, but helping them to stick to their healthy eating as well.

I am offering a bonus that includes (5) packs and bundles totaling 61 pages of content, as well as images and social media posts. But first, here is what you will get with Ruth’s Healthy Meal Planning bundle:

Healthy Meal Planning & Prep Report
Editable eCovers
Royalty-Free Images
Tweets
Social Media Graphics
Meal Planning Checklist
Bonus Report: 6 Meal Planning Pitfalls and How to Avoid Them
Keywords

This bundle is only $7 right now, but it is on a dimesale, so the price will continue to go up as more sales come in. The sooner you buy, the more you save.

My Bonus

 

Now for the bonus! You will get the following content from my Health & Wellness PLR store if you use my link:

Paleo Meal Planning PLR Pack – 10 articles, grocery list, product suggestions (to promote)
Healthy Meal Planning PLR Bundle – 15 articles, 5-page report, images, social media posts
Vegetarian PLR Bundle – 15 articles, 6-page report, images, social media posts
Autumn Harvest Cooking PLR Pack – 10 articles
Grow Your Own Food PLR Bundle – 15 articles, 5-page report, images, social media posts

That is a lot of content to add to the healthy meal planning special you are getting from Ruth, all for less than $10.

Let me know if you have any questions!

 

My Top Content Writing Tips

 

 

Hi Friends!

I’m back today to help you with your writing. Even if you like to use PLR for the majority of the content on your blog, there are going to be moments when you need to some writing on your own. This might be blog posts when you can’t find the PLR you need, editing your current PLR, or writing your emails.

I put together some tips based on things I personally use, and that I highly recommend others try out. You definitely don’t have to follow every single one of them, since we’re all different, but these are things I do on a daily basis.

1. Write Your Intro Last

One of the first things I learned in my writing career is that I have trouble starting things. It doesn’t matter if it is the intro for a blog post, the first line in an eBook, or the first sentence for an email I send out. I really struggle with those first few sentences. So, what do I do? I skip it and do it last!

If you are someone that takes longer to write simply because you don’t know how to start, then skip it for now and write the easiest part of the content. This might some of the headers and sections, or even the conclusion. Plus, once the rest of the content is done, the intro paragraph is actually much easier to write since you know what angle the content has taken.

2. Find Your Writing Sweet Spot

One of the biggest surprises in my writing career is the fact that apparently I’m a morning person. I used to be a “Wake up at noon and still be tired” type of person. I have no idea how I became someone who loves getting up early and working right away. When I started my full-time freelance career in 2010, I figured out pretty quickly that I no longer minded getting up early. I actually quite enjoy it. It’s something about those first few hours of the day before everyone is up, when the dogs are still too tired to want to play, and it’s dark and quiet, that is optimal for me.

But this isn’t true for everyone. You have to find your own writing sweet spot. This is the time of the day, the situation, and the environment most conducive for writing. Not just when you feel more productive, but when your brain and body can work together to get the writing done. I go through phases throughout the day. I like to do most of my PLR writing in the morning, which is when I can get it done quickly and the quality is always better. At night, I am better with the more creative and humorous writing, so this is when I do my emails.

You have to really listen to your mind and body, experiment, and figure out when and where your writing is best.

3. Ignore the Errors for Now

It is tempting to correct errors you make while writing, but I personally believe it interrupts your flow. You may have other writers who prefer to correct as they go so that they have less proofreading to do later, but I find it to take away from my work. If I am constantly fixing typing errors or changing my word usage, it gets me out of the writing mindset. I find that it works much more efficiently if I just leave them, keep writing, then fix them all at the end. At the very least, just fix the errors after each section instead of after every single word or sentence.

4. Research and Outline Beforehand

Before you write, make sure you know exactly what you’re writing about. You would actually be surprised by how many people write a blog post or article or other type of content while researching. I don’t understand this concept, I’ll be honest. It makes no sense to me.

What I do is work in batches, whether it’s all the articles for a PLR pack or a set of 5-10 for larger bundles and launches. I research everything, then I outline each article I am working on. By the time I’m ready to write, I just work one section at a time until I’m done. It is so much easier.

5. Improve Your Typing Skills

When you can, I would try to work on your typing speed if you think there is room for improvement. There isn’t going to be a magical typing speed that is ideal, but you could always type a little faster. I think a big reason I can get a lot done is because I do tend to type of the faster end of the spectrum. And all you really need is practice! The only reason I can type 100+ wpm is because I worked several years of data entry followed by 10 years of writing. That is a LOT of practice.

To test your speed, I always recommend typingtest.com. They have different tests to choose from, it’s always free, and it is also good for practicing.

6. Write in a Smaller Font

This is one of those tips you might find to be a little strange, but I’m also a little strange, so it makes sense. When I am done with my PLR, I always change it to Arial 12. This is a good standard font size and one that is easy to read. Plus, if anyone ever prints out something I write, it looks great on paper.

The problem is that when I am writing at such a large font, it just distracts me. I have no idea why. I prefer to keep Microsoft Word at the standard Calibri 11 that it is on when you first open up the document. It’s not so much in your face and it is easier to separate paragraphs into reasonable lengths. Again, I know this is odd, but it totally helps me.

7. Minimize ALL Distractions

I think one of the hardest parts about writing is that there are a million distractions. You could be writing PLR, an email, or a novel, and the distractions are just as frustrating. If you have finally found your groove and your magical writing zone, the last thing you want to do is keep getting interrupted.

I recommend shutting down and turning off everything. The only thing you should have open on your computer is your word processing program. Turn off your phone, close all the apps on your laptop, close down the browser, turn off the TV. Since all your researching is done, the browser should not be necessary.

8. Read it Out Loud Before Publishing

When you get to the end of writing your content, you will then read it through a few times to catch any errors you might have missed. You can either do this manually or by using your word processor’s Spell Check function. However, I still recommend reading it through one more time, preferably out loud, or at least without skimming. Read it like you would a novel.

This helps you catch a lot of minor errors or things you want to change. You might have used a word too often, want to adjust some sentence structure, or change your voice in one of the sections. So much can be fixed just by reading your own stuff.

*9. Run it Through Copyscape

Always remember to run your completed content through Copyscape before publishing! Copyscape is only 5 cents for each time you check something and is well worth it. I know there are other plagiarism checkers, but I find this one to be the most accurate. Even if you didn’t plagiarize, sometimes your sentences can be too similar to something already on the internet, and it creates a problem.

That’s it. I hope this helped!

 

Why I Love Coloring Books for the Social Anxiety Niche

 

Yesterday, I told you about my brand new product, Social Anxiety. I know I have mentioned it before, but as someone with social anxiety (and 2 other anxiety disorders, and depression), I feel like I have a good handle on it. Like.. I’m not going to be making small talk with strangers any time soon, but I no longer feel like my heart might explode every time I walk outside.

Progress.

In terms of what you can promote with this niche, there is TONS. Books, fidget toys (fidget spinners anyone?), sketchbooks. But my personal favorite is coloring. I remember making a joke about wanting to hide in a fort with a coloring book whenever I got anxious. I’m super pissed I’m not being credited for inventing the adult coloring book and the rise of fort popularity. Oh well, moving on.

Here are 3 reasons I love coloring books for social anxiety (and why you should promote them):

1. It is the Perfect Mindless Distraction From Panic. A lot of times, people with social anxiety don’t just get anxious feelings and panic attacks during the actual social situation, but before. You know you are about to go out to a busy restaurant or for some people, just go outside with people, and it is terrifying. This creates a lot of anxiety before you step outside your front door. Coloring books are awesome for relaxing you.

2. Coloring Books Are Convenient. This is why I think you should promote them, and why I have tons of them at home. They’re easy to find, relatively inexpensive, usually small enough for most purses and handbags, even thin enough to fit in your laptop case. You don’t need much aside from some colored pencils (or crayons if you want to be super old school), and you’re good to go.

3. They Give You Something to do in Social Situations. This is what I personally think is the best part about them, and what people without social anxiety don’t realize. When you are caught in a social situation you don’t want to be in, like on the train or a packed airplane, you don’t want to make small talk. You don’t want to constantly pretend like you’re checking your phone even though you’re not. You just want to hide in your safe little bubble and ignore everyone. COLORING IS PERFECT FOR THIS.

The adult coloring book phenomenon is the best thing to ever happen for people with anxiety. I’m not above using the Frozen coloring book I “borrowed” from my neighbor’s kid, but I also like to pretend I at least have my sh*t somewhat together. If you have a coloring book that says ADULT on it, that counts right?

Check out my new Social Anxiety PLR Special if you haven’t yet.

 

 

New PLR in the Store: Fatty Liver Disease Prewritten Articles

 

 

Get 10 brand new pre-written articles all about fatty liver disease.

Now that I live with my sister, I get to watch whatever she is interested in. That means a lot of reality shows. But also – she loves Dr. Oz. While I am not a huge fan of ‘talk shows’, I do like that he tends to cover trending topics in health. Which is how I learned about fatty liver disease.

If you are interested in adding a hot, trending health topic to your blog or letting your subscribers know about it, I highly recommend this one.

This PLR pack comes with the following 10 article topics:

1. Types of Fatty Liver Disease (402 words)
2. How is Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Different? (420 words)
3. Signs You Have Fatty Liver Disease (437 words)
4. Foods to Clean Out Your Liver (420 words)
5. Lifestyle Changes for Managing This Disease (406 words)
6. Superfoods to Help With Fatty Liver (416 words)
7. What to Avoid if You Have Fatty Liver Disease (414 words)
8. Detox Drinks for Your Fatty Liver (444 words)
9. Herbs to Clean Out Your Liver (454 words)
10. Low-Carb Tips for a Fatty Liver (400 words)

Ways to Use This Pack

When you are working with pre-written articles, I find them to be the most versatile. You of course can leave them as articles and post as blog posts to your blog, but you also have some other options. I think these work great as:

Autoresponders – Teach your list all about fatty liver disease, while also including some promotional links in each email. You can also split these up into 5 autoresponders, and 5 blog posts.

Opt-in Report – The PLR articles can also be put into a report. Each article is a little over 400 words, which is the perfect length for each page of a report. You can do a 10-page report very easily, or longer if you decide to use images.

Part of a Larger eBook – If you want to expand on this topic, you can also do a longer eBook. If you want to do an eBook, I would do one all about liver health, then have fatty liver disease just one chapter in your book.

What Can You Promote?

I know this question is going to come up, so I thought I would address it now. The good thing about the topic of fatty liver disease is that most of the treatments are related to changing your diet, drinking water, exercising, and using herbs. Here is a small list of the many things you can promote:

  • Digital and physical books on liver health, dieting, exercise, or weight loss
  • Water infusing cups and pitchers
  • Herbs and supplements
  • Blenders, juicers, and cooking appliances for healthy eating
  • Exercise accessories and equipment

Grab the Fatty Liver Disease PLR pack here.

 

My Morning Routine for Better Productivity | Health & Wellness PLR

 

Earlier this month, I wrote an email about how I have been boosting my productivity lately. This also happens to be one of my favorite things to talk about, aside from food and dogs and also food. You can read the email here if you missed it.

To be completely honest with you, I have become a little obsessed with productivity. I like to push myself and see how much I can actually do during a typical work day. I feel like if I wrote 20 pages yesterday, I should be able to write 21 today. That seems logical, right? I don’t seem to have a firm grasp on how time works and that you don’t just get more of it as long as you’re motivated 😉

I have also discovered that I am a glutenous person. I always have to have more, more, more. I need to do more and earn more and write more. While it can be frustrating sometimes, it definitely keeps me on track (mostly).

Did I have a point? Yes. My morning routine.

As I mentioned in that email, I have started a new morning routine. I originally did it completely on a whim because I heard someone talk about The Miracle Morning book by Hal Elrod. I love me a good self-help book and almost never do what they tell me, so I figured why not continue the tradition?

I don’t do everything he tells you to do – which is basically to start a new morning routine for happiness, success, etc. I’m so good at book reviews, you guys. But it did encourage me to try some new things in the morning.

It used to take me forever to just get going in the morning. While I can technically work any time of day, I do best in the morning. I have somehow turned into a complete morning person where I’m awake and alert immediately, even before coffee.

I know. Freak.

So, to get the most done, I have figured out I need to start working pretty much immediately after taking the dogs out. This is what my current morning routine (for productivity) looks like:

The dogs wake me up at roughly 4am. Yeah. No, you read it right. FOUR in the morning. I take them out, then climb back into bed. This is where I used to go back to sleep until 8-ish, but now I stay up. And this is where my morning routine really starts.

I have 10 minutes of meditation. When I say ‘meditation’, I mean, ‘sitting quietly with my eyes closed, while focusing hard on not focusing on anything and threatening myself to stop thinking about work for 5 damn minutes’. It’s a work in progress.

Does it help? I don’t know. I still do it though. Plus, this combined with breathing exercises are supposed to help with my anxiety.

Next up is journaling. I love journaling. I love writing about it. I love doing it. I love starting new journals, getting about 1/3 of the way through them, then throwing them in a box so I can start a new one. That must be how sports people feel when they get new sports things. I clearly know a lot about sports.

I don’t set a specific time for this. It basically has become my ‘brain dump’, as one of my lovely subscribers put it (thank you!). Anything that is on my mind, good or bad, stressful or not, I write down. Some mornings I complain to my journal and force it to listen to my petulant whining. Other days, I start the day feeling hopeful and excited about work, so it’s all about what my next steps are in my business.

This is probably one of the best things I do that helps get me ready for the day.

Then I work on my to-do list for the day. Sometimes I combine this with my journal, but not always. I might talk about what I want to do for the day in the journal, but I need a more structured list to get everything done. DO IT. Seriously. If you don’t currently work off a to-do list, how in the world do you get anything done?!

If I could be best friends with things that aren’t people, it would be journals and to-do lists. Put it together however you want. Use pen and paper, write it in your planner, use Evernote or just a notepad on your computer. I am personally a fan of OneNote, because I can access it anywhere I have Microsoft Office.

Here is a sneak peak at my Saturday to-do list:

I put X in place of some of the titles of work I’m doing since it’s not all for my store (I still do ghostwriting on occasion), but you get an idea of what a typical weekend to-do list looks like for me.

*Note: I usually have a separate list for daily stuff like workouts, errands, etc. This is just my work to-do list.

Lastly, I do my morning workout. The final part of my morning routine is my workout, since after that I will take a shower, grab another cup of coffee, and then start work for the day. Depending on the day, it might be a short, 10-minute yoga workout, going to the harbor for a 3-mile walk, or just some bodyweight exercises when I’m pressed for time (planks, lunges, squats, burpees).

It’s hard to get my ass up and do the actual workout, but I always feel better afterward. It gives me energy for the day, plus if I get super lazy in the afternoon, I know I at least did something good for my body that day. And if it raises my metabolism, then cool. I love bonus health.

How long does it take? From start to finish, my morning routine can range from 1-2 hours. There are a lot of factors involved, like how long it takes me to actually get out of bed, how long my workout is, and whether or not I accidentally fell asleep during meditation (it happens often).

I started doing this just to get a better routine and schedule going, but in the process, I figured out it does wonders for my productivity. As you can see from my to-do list, I work a lot. And that’s a weekend list. I do more during the week. If what you’re doing right now isn’t working for you, why are you still doing it?! I ask myself that question often, usually when I’m crying about being fat with a donut in my mouth, but that’s beside the point.

I hope this helped. And if it didn’t, were you at least moderately entertained?

Jenn

 

 

3 Ways to Use the Apple Cider Vinegar PLR Report

New PLR Report: Apple Cider Vinegar

I have a new PLR report in the store all about Apple Cider Vinegar. I am really excited about this one because not only do I think it can be helpful and has tons of uses, but I have started adding ACV to my life as well. I know your readers will enjoy the health benefits.

This is an 8-page report with 7 sections and 2,945 words. It goes over the basics of ACV, plus the health benefits, and a lot of different ways you can use it. I wanted to give you some options for how to use this report, but first here is what you get in the report:

1. The Health Benefits of ACV
2. Beauty Uses For Apple Cider Vinegar
3. How Apple Cider Vinegar Can Help With Weight Loss
4. Easy Smoothie Recipes With ACV
5. How to Detox Your Body With Apple Cider Vinegar
6. Salad Dressings That Use Apple Cider Vinegar
7. What to Add to Your Apple Cider Vinegar Drinks

3 Ways to Use This Report

I love writing PLR reports because they have so many uses. You can use them as a content upgrade to get more email subscribers, or just give them away as a nice gift for your current subscribers. Here are three more options:

  1. Turn it Into a Blog Series

The first thing you can do is break up the report into its 7 sections, and use each of these sections as a different blog post. I would keep the first section as the first blog post, which introduces your readers to ACV and its benefits, but the rest you can choose the order.

  1. Incorporate an Email Series

Another way to use the sections individually is to do an email series instead. The other option is to do the blog series, then incorporate emails for each blog post that correspond with it, and also get people to go over and click on the posts. For example, when talking about detoxing your body with apple cider vinegar (section 5), the email that day can be about different natural ways to detox your body, then link to the ACV blog post.

  1. Add it to a Natural Health eBook

If you want to create something a little more substantial, take this report and turn it into one chapter in a book all about natural health remedies.

As you can see, there is a lot you can do with this one!

Click here to grab the Apple Cider Vinegar PLR report.